Giovanni Battista Nazari, Three Dreams on the Transmutation of Metal, 1599 (via deathandmysticism)

Giovanni Battista Nazari, Three Dreams on the Transmutation of Metal, 1599 (via deathandmysticism)

The nature of the coast (via the-rx)

The nature of the coast (via the-rx)

"If we were doomed to live forever, we would scarcely be aware of the beauty around us."

Peter Matthiessen (via theparisreview)

12 horas y 1 fotografía (via ratak-monodosico)

12 horas y 1 fotografía (via ratak-monodosico)

(via)

(via)

"Silence is more than the absence of sound…. Silence breaks things. Silences have to speak."

Christine Hume (via omnidawn)

Orra White Hitchcock for use in Professor Edward Hitchcock’s classes on geology and natural history. (1828-1840) (via the-rx)

"We were approaching winter like an object which cannot be put between words. Behavior became simpler since we had dislocated our memories. Still, much was. A little confusion in the propositions will allow for this. Or truth can be so strenuous it makes you lean against the window frame. I thought of breathing deeply to find Venus reflected in the river. Then I would know if standing beside you leaves my lips dry. But I was really dissecting your name by means of definitions which would point the way to the missing copula where I could see the sky. Though the clouds could be uttered in a variety of tones, the stars formed constellations analyzed completely. You cried for the moon, which had started to wane in agreement with constant and variable. What this silver sliver failed to reveal, its expression between my thighs would clarify."

Rosmarie Waldrop,from Curves to the Apples (New Directions, 2006)

(Source: apoetreflects)

(Source: anticipatedstranger)

"It sometimes seems to me that a pestilence has struck the human race in its most distinctive faculty—that is, the use of words. It is a plague afflicting language, revealing itself as a loss of cognition and immediacy, an automatism that tends to level out all expression into the most generic, anonymous, and abstract formulas, to dilute meanings, to blunt the edge of expressiveness, extinguishing the spark that shoots out from the collision of words and new circumstances."

Italo Calvino, “Exactitude,” from Six Memos for the New Millennium