What interests me, of course, is the book. I keep wondering what Prospero was reading on that first boat journey. I imagine my father, shadowed and tubercular, profile deepened against water, reading the last poem Shelley had written before he died in Spoleto. Or maybe it was the passage in Melville, in which our archipelago is unnamed but recalled by the beckoning of a black vast sea, between the description of ropes and the listing of harpoons. Or perhaps it had been the tale of his namesake Prospero, a betrayed man on a boat, laden only with books and a child.

From Bibliolepsy by Gina Apostol. (via othersashas)

"To surpass the isolation of writing."
*
"Kafka’s love for Felice is an utter literary whim: by writing Felice, his heroine, he is simply writing his only love story."
*
"When I think of my desire, still unexpressed, I tell myself: this can only resolve itself in darkness."
*
"The erotic apparition of two blind children, their sockets are hollow and seem to have been filtered through with blue, the one, bigger, is holding the other by the shoulder, and they charge through the crowd with savagery, they must have terrible secrets."
*
"It is sometimes necessary to choose: reading or writing."
*
from The Mausoleum of Lovers, the notebooks of Hervé Guibert (trans. Nathanael, published by Nightboat)

"To surpass the isolation of writing."

*

"Kafka’s love for Felice is an utter literary whim: by writing Felice, his heroine, he is simply writing his only love story."

*

"When I think of my desire, still unexpressed, I tell myself: this can only resolve itself in darkness."

*

"The erotic apparition of two blind children, their sockets are hollow and seem to have been filtered through with blue, the one, bigger, is holding the other by the shoulder, and they charge through the crowd with savagery, they must have terrible secrets."

*

"It is sometimes necessary to choose: reading or writing."

*

from The Mausoleum of Lovers, the notebooks of Hervé Guibert (trans. Nathanael, published by Nightboat)

Whatever I take, I take too much or too little; I do not take the exact amount. The exact amount is no use to me.
*
When one does not love the impossible, one does not love anything.
*
Every time I wake I understand how easy it is to be nothing.
*
Now you do not know what to do, not even when you go back to being a child. And it is sad to see a child who does not know what to do.
*
Only a few arrive at nothing, because the way is long.
*
- from Antonio Porchia’s Voices, translated by W.S. Merwin (via kendallstorey)

Whatever I take, I take too much or too little; I do not take the exact amount. The exact amount is no use to me.

*

When one does not love the impossible, one does not love anything.

*

Every time I wake I understand how easy it is to be nothing.

*

Now you do not know what to do, not even when you go back to being a child. And it is sad to see a child who does not know what to do.

*

Only a few arrive at nothing, because the way is long.

*

- from Antonio Porchia’s Voices, translated by W.S. Merwin (via kendallstorey)

An hiroglyphic epistle from the Devil to Lord North.
"My D(ear) Ld
(Ewer) Pol———cal Con(duck)t h(ass) (knot) only made a (grate) Noise upon (ear)th (butt) has set (awl) Hell in an upr(oar). T(hare)s hardly a S(tête)(man) in the (plaice), and we have a good (man)y of them, but (looks) upon it (ass) uni(form). The o(pen)ing of (ewer) (last) Budget w(ass) in m(eye) o(pinion) a (masterstroke indeed (witch) (yew) may easily (mask) over with the Old Phrase Pro Bono Publico. No (body) (can) stig(mat)ize (ewer) L———d(ship) as a griping (minister) nor (can) any (1.) say (yew)ve in this Point laid a t(axe) on the Bowels of the Poor. T(hare) are sever(awl) Articles m(eye) L—d in the Way of Eating (witch) might illustrate (ewer) Good Will (toe) the public, the quant(eye)ty of Meat (witch) is Consumed by the Common (people) Is the Occasion of t(hat) scorbutic or Scurvy Di(sword)er (witch) affects the English Constitution. T(hare)(4) an Xcise laid upon flesh of (awl) sorts would (bee) the best (ant)iscorbutic in the Whole Materia Medica and (ass) (ewer) L—d(ship) is (knot) very (car)nally Inclined (Eye) (don)t doubt (butt) (yew) will shortly b(ring) such a (bill) in(toe) Parlia(men)t. (Fish) and .F(owl) (2) my L—d are of a very viscid Nat(ewer) and are apt to enrich the Blood of such (ass) ought (toe) (bee) kept low, a T(axe) on these Sorts of Food Would in (Time) p(rope)rly dilute & thin the Corpore(awl) (deuce)s [juices] and the Common (people) would (knot) t(hen) (bee) (awl) (toe) (gate) (hare) [altogether] so (saw)cy (ass) (toe) oppose the Measures of t(hare) (ministers) and per(suns) in power (awl)so a Smart dut(eye) on Bread (mill)k Sm(awl) Beer, (Water) &c. For wh(eye) should the Vulgar have any Thing (toe) Eat (butt) Grass Without paying Tri(boot).
(Ewer) Constant Friend & Ally
BELZEBUB.”
Published in Dublin, June 23th 1779.
(via myimaginarybrooklyn)

An hiroglyphic epistle from the Devil to Lord North.

"My D(ear) Ld

(Ewer) Pol———cal Con(duck)t h(ass) (knot) only made a (grate) Noise upon (ear)th (butt) has set (awl) Hell in an upr(oar). T(hare)s hardly a S(tête)(man) in the (plaice), and we have a good (man)y of them, but (looks) upon it (ass) uni(form). The o(pen)ing of (ewer) (last) Budget w(ass) in m(eye) o(pinion) a (masterstroke indeed (witch) (yew) may easily (mask) over with the Old Phrase Pro Bono Publico. No (body) (can) stig(mat)ize (ewer) L———d(ship) as a griping (minister) nor (can) any (1.) say (yew)ve in this Point laid a t(axe) on the Bowels of the Poor. T(hare) are sever(awl) Articles m(eye) L—d in the Way of Eating (witch) might illustrate (ewer) Good Will (toe) the public, the quant(eye)ty of Meat (witch) is Consumed by the Common (people) Is the Occasion of t(hat) scorbutic or Scurvy Di(sword)er (witch) affects the English Constitution. T(hare)(4) an Xcise laid upon flesh of (awl) sorts would (bee) the best (ant)iscorbutic in the Whole Materia Medica and (ass) (ewer) L—d(ship) is (knot) very (car)nally Inclined (Eye) (don)t doubt (butt) (yew) will shortly b(ring) such a (bill) in(toe) Parlia(men)t. (Fish) and .F(owl) (2) my L—d are of a very viscid Nat(ewer) and are apt to enrich the Blood of such (ass) ought (toe) (bee) kept low, a T(axe) on these Sorts of Food Would in (Time) p(rope)rly dilute & thin the Corpore(awl) (deuce)s [juices] and the Common (people) would (knot) t(hen) (bee) (awl) (toe) (gate) (hare) [altogether] so (saw)cy (ass) (toe) oppose the Measures of t(hare) (ministers) and per(suns) in power (awl)so a Smart dut(eye) on Bread (mill)k Sm(awl) Beer, (Water) &c. For wh(eye) should the Vulgar have any Thing (toe) Eat (butt) Grass Without paying Tri(boot).

(Ewer) Constant Friend & Ally

BELZEBUB.”

Published in Dublin, June 23th 1779.

(via myimaginarybrooklyn)